Multi-Member LLCs and 1031s?

When it comes to 1031s, it is all about whose name is on the original tax return. This goes for LLCs as well as individuals. Multi-member LLCs follow the same rules as everyone else. The name on the original tax return must be the name on the title of the replacement property. If an LLC is multi-member, they probably file taxes as a partnership. Each LLC can sell the property it owns and do a 1031 to buy a replacement property. If you find a replacement property that is big enough, then each LLC could sell and buy a % of the larger replacement as a tenant in common.

Example – each LLC owns a property that is worth $500,000. They could both sell and 1031 each into a 50% tenant in common interest of a property worth $1 million.

Once the LLCs have completed their exchanges, they could simply remain as tenants in common. Or could work with their accountants to dissolve one or both and leave the property in one LLC with the same membership interest allocation.

How Much Should You Be Paying for a 1031 Exchange? [New Research!]

Check out Dave’s recent article on the cost of 1031 Exchanges on the Bigger Pockets Blog here.

2 Things You Should Know About a Reverse Exchange

In simple terms, a reverse exchange is a 1031 exchange where the replacement property is purchased before the original investment property is sold. But they aren’t quite as simple as a 1031 exchange. It should be said before anything else, find a qualified intermediary (QI) before beginning the process.

1.   Financing can be a hassle if you are in need of funds for the purchase until you sell. In a reverse, the QI takes title to the new property in the EAT (Exchange Accommodating Title holder). So the loan has to be made to the EAT but guaranteed by you.

2.   The Reverse is relatively expensive because a holding company must be created to hold the replacement property until the exchange is complete.

Because of its complexity, taking some time with your QI to get fully educated on the nuances of the reverse will be well worth your while. It is always wise to check with your tax expert before making any moves towards a 1031.

What’s in it For Me?

If you are thinking of carrying out a 1031 exchange, you might be wondering, “What’s in it for me?” A 1031 has the power to transform your real estate investing strategy. More specifically, a 1031 offers you a chance to defer capital gains taxes and get your proceeds working for you. In order to qualify for a 1031, your intent must to hold the property for investment purposes only. What you will find is that as you hold your property for investing, it will also hopefully be accruing appreciation. With more equity to toy around with you are on your way to leveraging your first investment property into something better.

Once you are ready to exchange your first property, it is time to get imaginative. A 1031 gives you immense freedom when finding a replacement property. While primary residences, personal property, and inventory (fix and flips) are not allowed with a 1031, all other types of investment real estate are on the table. You can even leverage your first property into multiple replacement properties. A 1031 offers you a real chance to snowball wealth and build your fortune.

BRRRR?

Real estate investment bloggers and founders of investor networking site Bigger Pockets, Joshua Dorkin and Brandon Turney, created an acronym to describe a powerful business model for the long-term holding investor.

It’s called the “BRRRR” Strategy (as in, I’m shivering cold).

B- Buy

R- Rehab

R- Rent

R- Refinance

R- Repeat

BRRRR is all about buying real estate investments with the long-term goal of holding, fixing the property up, and getting a renter in it. When the property appreciates, you can access the additional dollars of equity to then go buy a new real estate property. When you use this strategy, you leverage yourself toward becoming a very serious real estate investor very quickly while using the 1031 exchange to defer capital gains tax. You can adapt that model very easily into a buy, rehab, rent, refinance, repeat, and then another r for “relax” for a period of time. This allows you to demonstrate your intent to hold that property. You could also add “reevaluate” to decide whether it’s time to sell the original property. This valuable strategy will help keep you on track with the 1031 exchange and help you keep in mind what you have to do in order to use this program lawfully.

What’s most important is that you begin the process with your accountants and other team members knowing that this is a property that you will be holding, not one that you are “flipping” and reselling. Once you’ve established your intent with the property, you can use the 1031 exchange to eliminate due taxes and transfer them to your next investment.

Free Webinar: 1031 Exchange Investor Essentials

Register here for this October 18th webinar from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ET.

Not sure what to make of all the buzz about 1031 Exchanges? Let me introduce you to this powerful section of the IRS tax code and walk you through its legality and benefits.

Confused by what you have heard about all the requirements? Intimidated by the deadlines? I’ll help eliminate the fear factor with clear and concise information.

Think this option doesn’t apply to you? I’ll provide 1031 exchange options for when the replacement property is identified first or requires renovation.

Whether you have 50 properties or are new to real estate investing, I encourage you to join me for one hour and learn how 1031 Exchanges can accelerate your portfolio growth.

Register here for this October 18th webinar from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ET.

Can You Exchange a Hotel for a Restaurant with a 1031?

A 1031 exchange is a useful way for investors to defer capital gains taxes while reinvesting their proceeds. In order to carry out the exchange in a proper manner you will need to make sure that your replacement property is of “like kind.” Seeing that a 1031 exchange is also called a “Like-Kind Exchange,” it is reasonable to assume that it is very important to ensure that the new property is of like kind. But what does like kind mean in regard to a 1031?

Like kind essentially means that the replacement property must be used for investment purposes only. Primary residences do not qualify. A replacement property can be any type of real estate as long as it is being used for investment purposes. You can exchange a hotel for a restaurant. A warehouse for a farm. Even oil and gas interests for a single-family home.

Why do Fix and Flips Not Get Along With 1031 Exchanges?

I have said it before, and I will say it again; a 1031 is all about the intent. A 1031 exchange is designed to help investors exchange investment real estate while deferring capital gains tax. To qualify as investment real estate a property must be held for productive use. Productive use is a rather broad phrase that essentially means “The land must be doing something.” It could be used for renting, appreciation, agriculture, etc. It just has to be clear that the intent of the land is for productive use.

A fix and flip is a property that is bought to be sold. There is no intent to hold the property for productive use. As such it will not qualify for a 1031 until it can be proven that the real estate in question is for more than just selling. If you really want to carry out a 1031, your local tax guru might have a few ideas on how you can demonstrate your intent to hold your property for investment.

Does a Vacation Home Qualify for a 1031 Exchange?

A 1031 exchange is all about intent. In order for real estate to qualify for a 1031 exchange, the property must clearly be for investment purposes. A multifamily home that is being rented out is a clear example of a piece of real estate that is being used for investment purposes. A vacation home that is rented out for people to stay in is another example of an investment property.

But one of the reasons to own a vacation rental is to use it yourself. And family members will certainly be asking you to let them stay for free. Free stays from family members and personal trips to the lake house count as “personal use.” So how do you know when you’ve crossed a line and turned your investment property into a second home. Luckily, the IRS has a clarifying “Safe Harbor” rules. A vacation home qualifies for a 1031 if;

(a) The dwelling unit is owned by the taxpayer for at least 24 months immediately before the exchange (the “qualifying use period”)

(b)  Within the qualifying use period, in each of the two 12-month periods immediately preceding the exchange,

(c)  The taxpayer rents the dwelling unit to another person or persons at a fair rental for 14 days or more, and

(d) The period of the taxpayer’s personal use of the dwelling unit does not exceed the greater of 14 days or 10 percent of the number of days during the 12-month period that the dwelling unit is rented at a fair rental. For this purpose, the first 12-month period immediately preceding the exchange ends on the day before the exchange takes place (and begins 12 months prior to that day) and the second 12-month period ends on the day before the first 12-month period begins (and begins 12 months prior to that day).

It is always a good idea to check with your local tax expert to ensure that your property meets all the requirements listed above

Can You Exchange One Property into Multiple Properties With a 1031 Exchange?

One of the most powerful aspects of a 1031 is its ability to truly broaden your investing horizons. Rather than simply exchanging one property for another, investors have the potential to diversify and place their tax deferred proceeds into multiple investment properties. Turning one piece of real estate into two or three is not a bad way to start building an investing empire.

It is also good to remember that “like kind” in a 1031 does not mean that the properties you are exchanging have to be exactly the same. You can exchange a residential apartment complex for an industrial warehouse. You are limited only by your imagination and desire to diversify. Though, it is also wise to see what your local tax expert advises.